NASA Reports Protective Ozone Layer is Recovering Reply

If you trust the content of this report, NASA claims the ozone hole is generally on the mend from measurements made in the stratosphere at 20 miles above the earth.  An altitude of twenty miles translates to about 100,000 feet above the ground where commercial and transport military aircraft – powered by high-bypass turbofan engines – can not fly.  Limited to a maximum service ceiling of about 42,000 feet, these aircraft can only release emissions in troposphere below 42,000 feet as opposed to the stratosphere – at 100,000 feet in the case of the ozone layer.

The public deserves a “trustworthy” full spectrum lab analysis of the troposphere below 40,000 feet to report the full extent of chemical pollution deployed from aircraft engines and “contrails” in the public’s breathable air supply.

NASA Science News Header

Mystery in the Ozone Layer

Sept. 5, 2014:  High above Earth, more than 20 miles above sea level, a diaphanous layer of ozone surrounds our planet, absorbing energetic UV rays from the sun.  It is, essentially, sunscreen for planet Earth. Without the ozone layer, we would be bathed in dangerous radiation on a daily basis, with side effects ranging from cataracts to cancer.

Mystery in the Ozone Layer

Sept. 5, 2014:  High above Earth, more than 20 miles above sea level, a diaphanous layer of ozone surrounds our planet, absorbing energetic UV rays from the sun.  It is, essentially, sunscreen for planet Earth. Without the ozone layer, we would be bathed in dangerous radiation on a daily basis, with side effects ranging from cataracts to cancer.

People were understandably alarmed, then, in the 1980s when scientists noticed that manmade chemicals in the atmosphere were destroying this layer. Governments quickly enacted an international treaty, called the Montreal Protocol, to ban ozone-destroying gases such as CFCs then found in aerosol cans and air conditioners.  On September 16, 1987, the first 24 nations signed the treaty; 173 more have signed on in the years since.

Fast forward 27 years.  Ozone-depleting chemicals have declined and the ozone hole appears to be on the mend. The United Nations has called the Montreal Protocol “the most successful treaty in UN history.” Yet, despite Montreal’s success, something is not … quite … right.  *** Continue

Example of aircraft emissions in the

Troposphere between 30 and 40,000 feet.

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