Fireworks Chemistry Offers Clues to Chemtrails 3

 

 Complex chemistry creates 4th of July color

By: Polly Keary (Source)
July 1, 2014

Ever wonder what makes that sparkler burn red, or the stardust over head bloom purple and gold?

The answer is found in some fairly complex chemistry.

Chemtrails and Fireworks Family

Fireworks makers must balance propellants, fuel, binders and color-creating chemicals in just the right way to produce the spectacular effects so familiar on the Fourth of July.

Generally, the brighter and whiter the firework, the hotter the burn of the chemical.

Often the brightest fireworks are actually burning metals, such as aluminum, magnesium and titanium.

More vivid colors may come from cooler-burning salts. And sometimes, in order to produce the desired effect, chemicals are bound in such a way as to produce a reaction while burning.

In order to get green, chemists may mix barium and chlorinated rubber in a fireworks tube. When ignited, the combustion releases chlorine, which reacts with the barium to make barium chloride, when produces a green color.

Also, a good firework is not too smoky. Chemists have to be careful to compose fireworks in such as way that as little smoke as possible is produced.

Once the chemicals are chosen and mixed, then they are placed in the shell in packets or capsules in such as way as to explode in the right order and at the right time.

Here are some of the chemicals that create the different colors you might see in the sky on the Fourth of July.

Red: Lithium salts, strontium salts

Orange: Calcium salts

Gold: A combination of iron and carbon, such as charcoal or lampblack

Yellow: Sodium compounds

Brilliant white: Magnesium, aluminum or barium oxide

Green: Barium compounds

Blue: Copper and chlorine

Purple: Strontium and copper compounds

Silver: titanium, aluminum or magnesium

 

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3 comments

  1. Pingback: Fireworks Chemistry Offers Clues to Chemtrails | AirCrap.org

  2. Here you can see what color burning chemicals make -so far I understand… and I think same goes on when the same chemicals are sprayed from the sky… as the fireworks get shut up to the sky… Fireworks!
    http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu/chemweek/fireworks/fireworks.htm
    The colors are produced by heating metal salts, such as calcium chloride or sodium nitrate, that emit characteristic colors. The atoms of each element absorb energy and release it as light of specific colors. The energy absorbed by an atom rearranges its electrons from their lowest-energy state, called the ground state, up to a higher-energy state, called an excited state. The excess energy of the excited state is emitted as light, as the electrons descend to lower-energy states, and ultimately, the ground state. The amount of energy emitted is characteristic of the element, and the amount of energy determines the color of the light emitted. For example, when sodium nitrate is heated, the electrons of the sodium atoms absorb heat energy and become excited. This high-energy excited state does not last for long, and the excited electrons of the sodium atom quickly release their energy, about 200 kJ/mol, which is the energy of yellow light.

    The amount of energy released, which varies from element to element, is characterized by a particular wavelength of light. Higher energies correspond to shorter wavelength light, whose characteristic colors are located in the violet/blue region of the visible spectrum. Lower energies correspond to longer wavelength light, at the orange/red end of the spectrum.

    Color Compound Wavelength (nm)
    red strontium salts, lithium salts lithium
    — carbonate, Li2CO3 = red strontium carbonate,
    — SrCO3 = bright red 652

    orange calcium salts calcium chloride, CaCl2 628

    yellow sodium salts, sodium chloride, NaCl 610-621

    green barium compounds +
    chlorine producer barium chloride, BaCl2 589

    blue copper compounds + chlorine producer copper(I)
    chloride, CuCl 505-535
    purple mixture of strontium (red) and
    copper (blue) compounds 420-460

    silver burning aluminum, titanium, or magnesium ??
    ****************************************************************************************
    NOW THE COLOR OF THE SKY START TO MAKE SENSE… AND THE COLOR OF LITHIUM WAS A LOT VISBLE LAST SUMMER /AUTUMN AFTER THE US GOV SHOOT UP 4 ROCKETS CONTAINING LITHIUM…..THAT MAKES CRAZY RED COLORS….AND LAST YEAR IT WAS UNUSUAL MUCH….THE RED COLOR…

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